Author Topic: Dost thou short shift?  (Read 3847 times)

Riche

  • Guest
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2005, 03:27:42 PM »
Thank you H2O

I like my stock pipe sound

QBS

  • Contributing Member
  • Visionary Grand Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 3282
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2005, 04:38:22 PM »
Mention has been made of the term "lugging" the engine.  Would those that used this term please define what it means to them?  Cheers.

h2olawyer

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 6259
  • 1982 Yamaha XZ550RJ+ Vision
    • Robert M. Grover
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2005, 05:10:30 PM »
Quote
I like my stock pipe sound


Riche -

I think there are a few of us odd-balls that prefer the stock pipes.  (Apologies to Rick_G & his "Hoover with a head cold" impression :D )  I just took some helmet cam video with the mic placed in front of the tank bag - well protected - worked great & no wind rumble.  Anyway, the sound of the bike @ 9K with stock pipes is excellent.  Even at 4 ~ 5K, cruising around town, there is plenty of volume.  I'd never noticed it much while wearing the helmet.  Next video, I'll find a place for the mic nearer the tail end to get more of the true exhaust note - maybe clipped up inside the taillight.

H2O

If you have an accident on a motorcycle, it's always your fault. Tough call, but it has to be that way. You're in the right, and dead -on a bike. The principle is not to have any accident. If you're involved in an an accident, it's because you did not anticipate. Then, by default, you failed.

Riche

  • Guest
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #23 on: May 16, 2005, 06:24:22 PM »
Quote

I think there are a few of us odd-balls that prefer the stock pipes.



Oh...we are the odd balls?..  8)

Lugging... interesting.
Lugging would be the rpm where the engine doesn't readily respond to throttle input. Generally a lower rpm but with increased load (read higher gear with steeper hill) the rpm at which lugging occurs is higher in the rpm range. Not desireable for long engine life.

You can hear "lugging", you can feel it. Avoid it  ;)

admin

  • ROV Administrator
  • ROV Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 448
  • Jetson your fired !
    • riders of vision
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #24 on: May 16, 2005, 08:30:24 PM »

Thanks H2 for the loud pipes article, well stated.
I also liked the stock exhaust before it rotted out, I've been through 3 of them in fact.     >:(
I think that it's pretty much the damn open pipe Harley guys that annoy the crap out of everyone, at least around here.


QBS don't lug the engine, it's very bad!
lugging is labouring the engine in too high a gear




Lucky

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 9877
  • That's my baby!!
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #25 on: May 16, 2005, 08:47:01 PM »
and just to clarify, my Macs are not deafeningly loud. there is some packing in the baffles. yes, standing next to the bike, you do have to speak a bit louder than normal, but shouting is not needed. nowhere near the volume of Harley straight pipes...

--Lucky
1982/3 XZ550 Touring Vison, Gold on Black

h2olawyer

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 6259
  • 1982 Yamaha XZ550RJ+ Vision
    • Robert M. Grover
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #26 on: May 16, 2005, 10:21:40 PM »
Quote

Thanks H2 for the loud pipes article, well stated.


Remembered reading it a while back & took some time to find it again.  Posted it to give something beyond anecdotal evidence regarding loud exhausts.  Not meant as a condemnation for those who choose to run loud, just something to think about - especially when riding through a quiet neighborhood in the early morning or late night hours.

This has been a good discussion.

FWIW - I normally keep the REVs below 7K in town when accelerating and between 4 ~ 5K cruising.  When I get away from population, I use the whole powerband.  Don't normally get over 9 ~ 9.5K as the acceleration tends to drop off at that point anyway.  After a tune-up, I will let it get to 10K in a couple gears just to make sure it's running properly.

H2O
If you have an accident on a motorcycle, it's always your fault. Tough call, but it has to be that way. You're in the right, and dead -on a bike. The principle is not to have any accident. If you're involved in an an accident, it's because you did not anticipate. Then, by default, you failed.

QBS

  • Contributing Member
  • Visionary Grand Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 3282
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2005, 05:25:06 PM »
Thank you all very much for your informed responses.  Hopefully our dialog has or will give some of our less experianced Vnaries a better perspective of the wonderful flexibility and low end torque of the V engine.

Lest you all think me an abusive cretin, please know that while I do use the very lowest end of the torque curve on a regular basis, this done with a great deal of attentive sensitivity to keeping the crank spinning free and easy.  The load applied to the engine under these conditions is always very carefully monitored and immediately eased at the first sense of labor.  I been living with this bike for so long (21 years) that I know exactly when to draw the line before I get there.

If the crank is spining free and easy, then the engine is not been lugged.  This is regardless of the gear the bike is in or the speed being traveled.  Having said that, I would also add that at low rpm and high gear choices the potential to lug the engine is always immediately available.  Therefore, one should only operate the V under these conditions with the greatest of attention and sensitivity.  Cheers.

Brian Moffet

  • Contributing Member
  • Visionary Grand Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 2648
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2005, 11:12:12 AM »
I usually short shift unless I need to get out of the way.  If that occurs, all the way to red-line is open, and I've been known to drop down 2 gears.

As far as loud pipes, humans in cars are more likely to notice a change in lighting, such as the on-off flash of headlights that some bikes have.  Pedestrians, bicyclists, home owners, and others that do not pose a risk to a motorcycles in the short term notice loud pipes.  In the long term these same people, especially the home-owners, cause major harm to all motorcyclists by getting localities to implement stringent laws.

For more information, look at the American Motorcyclist web page, (www.ama-cycle.org) and in particular http://www.amadirectlink.com/legisltn/positions/noise.asp

Having been on the sidewalk when an open pipe bike rolls by, and 10 minutes later still having ringing in my ears, I am against them.

Brian

Lucky

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 9877
  • That's my baby!!
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #29 on: May 18, 2005, 02:44:42 PM »
I think that if thaere blasting, but i can't see how moderately loud could hurt...
1982/3 XZ550 Touring Vison, Gold on Black

Extent

  • ROV Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 812
    • Levanthia.com
Re: Dost thou short shift?
« Reply #30 on: May 18, 2005, 03:38:43 PM »
I only short shift in my car (have to when it dosen't have much more power than the V) but when I'm on the bike I always touch thru every gear when I'm accelerating, even if it's only for a second or two like after I ring it out on a freeway onramp.  The only time I'll skip a gear while shifting is when I'm downshifting while slowing a significant amount.  Even then half the time I'll still touch in every gear on the way down to practice shifting while braking.

As far as what I rev to around town I'll shift up at 6 or 7 maybe, all based on feel.  When I'm sport riding I don't let it drop below 5k, and I don't like entering a turn at much less than 6k.  I usually shift up at 8 or 8.5, I only run it out to redline when I'm in a decent straight and I can pay more attention to the Tach since my rev limit is cut.
Rider1>No wonder, the Daytona has very sharp steering and aggressive geometry.  It's a very difficult bike for a new rider.
Rider2>Well it has different geometry now.