Author Topic: Vintage Racing  (Read 4773 times)

Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Vintage Racing
« on: June 08, 2016, 04:59:46 PM »
Thought I would give vintage racing a go this year...The club is called Vintage Road Racing Association (VRRA). Four events per year (June, July, August and September) in Ontario (Canada)

A rule change came about this season to allow 4 stroke, water cooled, bikes in Period 3 (up to 1982 model year). Previously it was air cooled 4 strokes. So in light of the rule change I figured it only fitting for a Vision to join in.

This past weekend was the first event. Definitely a steep learning curve but so much fun! Looking forward to the next three events and hopefully some track days.
You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd

Rikugun

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2016, 05:40:57 PM »
Very cool! How many laps? How many riders in your field? I want more details!

Looks like you have some homemade rearsets going on there and a remote reservoir rear shock. Where did you borrow that from?

It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is then to persist in delusion, however satisfying or reassuring.  Carl Sagan

Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2016, 07:08:53 PM »
All locations have different length tracks and the number of laps is determined by track length. This past weekend was Shannonville Pro track and heat races were 8 laps...Final races were 10 laps.

My heat race was 3 laps then a corner incident when a rider made contact between my swing arm and exhaust...things ended ok. I exited track onto grass area...stayed up-right...came to a stop in a safe area...the other rider didn't stay up right but was able to pick himself and his bike up and we both rode our bikes (under their own power) back to the pits.

The rearsets are from a fzr600 and the shock is a fox twin clicker (GSXR '89).My original plan has been to focus on the suspension so the fox shock was rebuilt and new spring (appropriate rate) installed. The front forks were re-worked with new springs, seals, bushings and emulators. Accelerated Technologies performed the suspension work...very knowledgable group.

I have volunteered with the club for the past 4 years (registrar, pit out, starter) and they are a fantastic group. My goal is to run the vision competitively and have fun...I don't have any illusions of being the fastest...

It's been a fun build so far but like you folks know as a build moves forward more ideas come to light...looking forward to making some changes during the up coming winter.
You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd

Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2016, 07:11:03 PM »
Oh and 26 riders in the P3 Light group this past weekend...
You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd

pinholenz

  • ROV Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 639
  • Love the Light
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2016, 04:56:57 AM »
Ouch! Looks like the opposing rider was trying to shove a rubber wedgie between your exhaust and the frame. You did well to stay upright with that amount of black scars. Is that a drip pan under the engine?
Only one '82.5  eXtreme Zen 550

Walt_M.

  • Contributing Member
  • Visionary Expert
  • ****
  • Posts: 2339
  • Hold my beer and watch this!
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2016, 06:33:38 AM »
That is a good looking bike. How flexible are the class rules? Looks like an '83 front fork and brakes but it could be Euro '82? What exhaust is that?
Whale oil beef hooked!

Rikugun

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2016, 09:14:16 AM »
Sorry to see some of your hard work was undone but glad you're OK. Twenty six riders is a decent sized field. Are practice sessions organized by type or open to all?

Although not on an XZ, I raced one season of WERA in the northeast US in the 80's so I'm having a bit of a vicarious nostalgia reading of your exploits.  It's really great to see one racing especially now when interest in the bike seems to be in a bit of a slump. Are there any other Visions? What other makes are represented? Do me a favor and bring someone next time with a camera. 

I like that you went after the suspension the way you did. I'd think that combined with the engine's attributes will allow you to be as competitive as you feel comfortable with and have fun. I'm jealous.  :D

It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is then to persist in delusion, however satisfying or reassuring.  Carl Sagan

Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2016, 06:06:25 PM »
Practice sessions are organized by one self assessment of their abilities; slow, medium or fast.

No other Visions. In the P3 Light class the most used bike to convert to racing is the Kawasaki GPZ550. The following is a link to the club website gallery:

http://www.vrra.ca/?page_id=1512

The rules are not so much flexible in that a bike isn't scrutinized but reasonable in that components are allowed if available in the class period or the components haven't changed from what was available in the period. Thus the twin clicker fox shock (technology) came available in 1981...the front forks with twin discs were available on the vision in '82 (Europe)...

I believe the exhaust was/is a Wolf system. Some cutting and welding and it's back in business.

Yes, drip pan...I like to refer to it as a last minute oil containment system:) I was challenged to get the bike ready for the opening weekend so I used the pan as a last minute addition. Oil containment is a requirement (rule) obviously in case of engine failure. I plan on adding a chin fairing with the lower area sealed off as the oil containment system prior to the next race.
You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd

Kenny

  • Contributing Member
  • ROV Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 700
  • Long Hauls
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2016, 08:43:43 PM »
  I used to spend a lot of time at Shannonville Track as it was only 1/2 hour from Wooler. I never took any of the Visions racing there but did take a Fast Course offered by Michell Mercier and rode an SV650 during that run.  When BMWOA had their first  National Rally outside of the U.S. they rented the track for a couple of days ,I rode my R1150rt  on the track for that event.
  At one time I met a fellow that was racing a Vision - I believe he was from Ottawa. He had a ten pack of different carbs in his Pit.
   Have fun and win a few!
               Cheers Kenny :)
2 XV 920rh 81
1 Red/White 83
1 Blue/White 83
Bmw R100rs 84
TDM 850  92

Rikugun

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2016, 07:33:30 AM »
Quote
He had a ten pack of different carbs in his Pit.

For any other make of bike I'd think this to be hyperbole. Not so much when it comes to the Vision.  :D
It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is then to persist in delusion, however satisfying or reassuring.  Carl Sagan

Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2016, 12:16:19 PM »
I'm not sure if I have enough carbs for a 10 pack...LOL...but did plan to have at least 2 spares that I had tried and I knew to be good to bolt on...
You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd

Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2016, 06:59:29 PM »
Some new photos with the oil containment...

Round two is in the books...made it through practice and race(s) without incident. The engine is working great, suspension needs some tweeking, rider....old, grey, and truly enjoying the experience...

I spent some time with the carbs and the engine works amazing. Pulls up to and through red line without any hesitation. Main jets are same as stock, low speed air jets are 97.5 and I completely removed the vacuum operated flap from the air box top. I'm going to keep opening up the air box with the goal of getting as much air/fuel as possible into the little beast.

I need to say a huge thank you for all that have shared their knowledge/experience in past posts and continue to help/encourage new owners.

You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd

Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2016, 07:04:41 PM »
On the grass pre-race...
You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd

fret not

  • Contributing Member
  • Visionary Expert
  • ****
  • Posts: 2109
  • Mike Lewis - Grass Valley CA
    • Michael Lewis Instruments
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2016, 01:27:51 AM »
Nicely done! 

In 1970 I took delivery of a new Yamaha TR2 (350cc factory production racer) and it came with a red front fender and wide red stripe along the white tank and on the seat/oil tank, much like you have here.  I painted it all orange after a while, but your 'livery' is very reminiscent of the factory paint, even down to the tuning fork decal.  Again, very nicely done.
Retired, on the downhill slide. . . . . . . . still feels like going uphill!

Rikugun

  • Visionary Grand Master
  • *****
  • Posts: 3216
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2016, 07:39:24 AM »
Quote
Round two is in the books...made it through practice and race(s) without incident. The engine is working great, suspension needs some tweeking, rider....old, grey, and truly enjoying the experience...
Can't ask for more than that. Sounds like you're having a blast. The chin fairing looks great - a stylish solution to the oil retention requirement.

Regarding removing the air box flapper, did you notice any difference good or bad?
It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is then to persist in delusion, however satisfying or reassuring.  Carl Sagan

cvincer

  • Contributing Member
  • ROV Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 211
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2016, 11:05:04 PM »

Have you tried   'velocity stacks'   as per  Treedragon ?

http://ridersofvision.net/rovforum/index.php?topic=12289.msg111742#msg111742





iain

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 238
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2016, 03:02:00 AM »
Treedragon also talked about exhaust crankcase evacuation as a performance mod...

Iain
NZ

jefferson

  • Contributing Member
  • ROV Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 427
  • Keep them Rollin
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2016, 09:03:00 PM »
You do want to run the breather hoses off the cam covers to a catch can instead of the airbox. The rules may specify this, but the bike will run better at high rpm when you do this. It would also be a good idea to come up with another cam cover with the large spigot and replace the one with the small spigot. All for better breathing.
One of the best things you can do for the handling is to immobilize the removable frame rail. The small bolts allow lots of manufacturing tolerance between the large holes in the frame rail. I have posted on this before and a search may bring up some specifics. The bike will be a lot smoother after this also.
Have a lot of fun out there. These things are a blast to beat up on newer and bigger bikes.

cvincer

  • Contributing Member
  • ROV Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 211
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #18 on: July 14, 2016, 08:52:15 PM »

Really liked this story courtesy of 'pinholzen'

http://ridersofvision.net/rovforum/index.php?topic=15554.msg143021#msg143021

Might give you some ideas.


Dean

  • ROV Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
Re: Vintage Racing
« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2016, 10:07:19 PM »
Thanks for the improvement ideas...all definitely worth exploring.

The front valve cover has been replaced with another rear cover so they both have the larger breather hole.
I'll do a search for the immobilizing of removable frame rail.
Definitely going to read about the velocity stacks.

Fret Nut...you recognized the vintage yamaha race colours...I was going for the look of the 1978 TZ...

As for removing the flapper, it came about through experimenting with the flapper adjustment. I was able to richen the low speed to the point where there wasn't hesitation when accelerating with the flapper completely open, even when accelerating from idle. So I simply removed it all together. The engine seems to run great.

Pinholzen had brought to my attention the yellow XZ...very cool bike...I'm thinking about borrowing some ideas from that bike to implement this winter. The rear brake setup looks great...
You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle! Dan Aykroyd