Author Topic: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?  (Read 342 times)

Tilir

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Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« on: July 10, 2019, 02:21:45 PM »
I bought a caliper from a 96 cbr 600 to swap onto my 82 vision. But being the retard i am didn't think about the differences in mounting screw holes. Anyone know of a bracket that would make it work?

Walt_M.

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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2019, 05:36:31 PM »
That is a tough one. There are adapters available for some blue spot and gold spot calipers but it has to do with mounting bolt spacing. How much do you have invested in the caliper you have?
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fret not

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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2019, 06:28:07 PM »
If you are going to modify your brakes/braking system I suggest you study the physical parts and direction of forces before bolting anything on your bike.  You should have a good understanding of how it all works, the forces involved, clearances needed, etc. because it MUST work properly.  One important aspect is the ratio of master cylinder diameter compared to the caliper piston(s) diameter.  This has a great deal of effect on how the brake lever feels when in use.  There is a chart and article on this subject that I posted previously, but this is not new news as the engineers that design these systems know and understand how important a good "feeling" is for providing feedback to the rider.  If the master cylinder piston is too large the brake will feel very stiff and wooden, if it is too small the brakes will feel like power brakes but you can run out of lever travel before strong braking can occur.  Little things like this are what make the difference between 'perfection' and problematic.
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injuhneer

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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2019, 09:47:15 AM »
If you are going to modify your brakes/braking system I suggest you study the physical parts and direction of forces before bolting anything on your bike.  You should have a good understanding of how it all works, the forces involved, clearances needed, etc. because it MUST work properly.  One important aspect is the ratio of master cylinder diameter compared to the caliper piston(s) diameter.  This has a great deal of effect on how the brake lever feels when in use.  There is a chart and article on this subject that I posted previously, but this is not new news as the engineers that design these systems know and understand how important a good "feeling" is for providing feedback to the rider.  If the master cylinder piston is too large the brake will feel very stiff and wooden, if it is too small the brakes will feel like power brakes but you can run out of lever travel before strong braking can occur.  Little things like this are what make the difference between 'perfection' and problematic.

And don't forget the pads. They can make the difference in a system. I like to have a high mechanical advantage (smaller master) with a sintered pad. Sintered pads have a very linear feel but work better after they are operated (heated) a bit. An organic pad provides a less abrupt response. Metallic and semi-metallic have their character as well. There is also material compatibility. Cast iron rotors work better with some pads. In other cases a stainless steel rotor.

So the bracket is just the beginning.
- Mike O
injuhneer
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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2019, 08:00:34 AM »

And don't forget the pads. They can make the difference in a system. I like to have a high mechanical advantage (smaller master) with a sintered pad. Sintered pads have a very linear feel but work better after they are operated (heated) a bit. An organic pad provides a less abrupt response. Metallic and semi-metallic have their character as well. There is also material compatibility. Cast iron rotors work better with some pads. In other cases a stainless steel rotor.

So the bracket is just the beginning.

Don't forget about ceramic pads.  Brembo ceramics are available in our pad size.  They are supposed to be generally better all round, and are only marginally dearer.  Not tried them out yet.

injuhneer

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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2019, 09:15:18 PM »

Don't forget about ceramic pads.  Brembo ceramics are available in our pad size.  They are supposed to be generally better all round, and are only marginally dearer.  Not tried them out yet.

Good point. Sometimes just getting a good pad/rotor combo on the stock caliper can help.

I'd like to upgrade to dual rotor but the right hand for lowers seem to be quite scarce.
- Mike O
injuhneer
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ArrrGeee

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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2019, 10:13:46 AM »
I bought a caliper from a 96 cbr 600 to swap onto my 82 vision. But being the retard i am didn't think about the differences in mounting screw holes. Anyone know of a bracket that would make it work?



not honda parts but I think you get the picture.
modifying your bike is not to be taken lightly and the stock brakes set up properly with stainless steel lines do work fine.

http://ridersofvision.net/rovforum/index.php?topic=14178.0

fret not

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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2019, 02:41:00 PM »
Yes, the voice of reason.  It is one thing to change the pad material for more or better grip, and the  steel braided brake lines are the way to go, but changing parts that demand proper fit (bolt holes, spacing, etc.) require a much deeper understanding and potential risk if they fail.

If you want to put a 'Honda (or from any other bike)' caliper on a Yamaha it must fit properly to function properly.  So either it can be directly bolted on or it needs to be 'fitted' via fabrication.  If this is a new concept to you the learning curve can be quite steep, but in the process skills will be required (either learned or hired).  For some this is a 'calling', to make a bike better than it ever was, and for some it is just decorating their bike for 'stylin' and profiling.  For some of us it is a bit of both, and since time is more plentiful than money I generally choose to do it myself, but I have been doing stuff like this for many years.  I took shop classes in high school (1958 - 1962) to learn welding, and later spent several years around a machine shop learning to use a lathe,  'new' welding/brazing techniques, and  hydraulic press while building a 125cc road racer from the ground up, and then a 250cc racer based on a Seeley frame.  In the process we had our hands in making fairings, seats, fuel tanks, frames, brakes, and exhaust systems as well as the insides of the motors.  Though it has been more than 40 years ago that I was active in this process I still retain some skills and ideas.  Looking back I see the journey as the destination.  And the sun still comes up in the morning. 8)
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fret not

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Re: Anyway to get a 96 cbr600 caliper to fit on a 82?
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2019, 03:07:40 PM »
The process of installing a caliper will require making sure it will fit the wheel/rotor without interference.  Put the caliper on the rotor to check for clearance, and if it is clear then put the caliper close to where it will be when mounted.  Then you need to study how it can be attached, where a bracket needs to be to attach to the caliper, and where and how the bracket must be to attach to the fork leg (slider).  The caliper must allow the wheel to run free with no rubbing or dragging on the wheel or the rotor, and must be at the proper angle to the rotor so the pads make the best(full) contact. 

As far as I can see the only reason to install a different caliper is to achieve better braking than is available from the stock unit(s).  With the availability of different pad materials for increased braking, the need for making such modifications less and less valuable.  One piston per caliper is the stock design.  I have selected a four piston caliper for my application because I think I can get sufficient braking from one large rotor (320mm).  This is only a little larger than the stock 29x mm rotor of the '82, but still has a bit better leverage than the original one.  I also chose the forks the caliper came from (FZR 1000) so my fabricating chore is much simpler, all I have to do is get the stock wheel to fit the forks and brakes.  This required making spacers for the axle and finding low profile heads for the bolts that hold the rotor.   Oh yeah, making the triple clamps too to make this all work out.
Retired, on the downhill slide. . . . . . . . still feels like going uphill!