Author Topic: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end  (Read 5724 times)

Lucky

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2012, 07:28:19 AM »
Kinda touchy there Riku. :) :)  no one is upset or is questioning your 'loyalty'... it's all good bro.
1982/3 XZ550 Touring Vison, Gold on Black

Rikugun

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2012, 12:34:56 PM »
Kinda touchy there Riku. :) :)  no one is upset or is questioning your 'loyalty'... it's all good bro.

Not touchy at all, don't read too much into it. The loyalty comment was a preemptive thing as there are some who can easily be offended!   :)
It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is then to persist in delusion, however satisfying or reassuring.  Carl Sagan

Rick G

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2012, 09:08:35 PM »
Fret ,  the GS110 should have lots of torque , the engine is certainly big enough. I was referring to bikes in the Visions size.
Rick G
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there in lurks the skid demon
'82.5 Yamaha XZ550 RJ  Vision,
'90 Suzuki VX800, 1990 Suzuki DR350.
'74  XL350   Honda , 77 XL350 Honda, 78 XL350 Honda, '82 XT 200 Yamaha, '67 Yamaha YG1TK, 80cc trail bike

fret not

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2012, 11:47:57 PM »
Years ago I have had Honda 4s in the 350, 500, and 750 sizes, and all could use more torque at lower RPMs.  I put GRIZZLY exhaust systems on all of them and got an immediate and welcome increase in low end torque but nothing like the box stock GS 1100.  Now I wonder what a GRIZZLY exhaust system would do for the Suzuki.  A big part of the effect as explained to me by the designer were the small diameter header pipes leading to the collector.  Higher RPMs are great if you are racing but for the street I much prefer power at lower range where the motor doesn't have to work so hard yet still can push you down the road at a good rate.  I still dream of a 750 XZ and think that Yamaha missed the boat by not making the Vision 750 cc.

Oh, and to help keep this thread on track, I checked the part number for the rear drive case of the Vision on the Ron Ayers site and found no number listed.  I carefully double checked the number and still no go, so it is unlikely the parts would interchange, as the venture series is a much longer running model and a superseded number from the XZ would show up related to the newer application.   Pretty obvious there is no crossover.  Similar looking design of the parts but just try mixing them up.  Now go prove me wrong and make it work. ;)
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 11:56:49 PM by fret nut »
Retired, on the downhill slide. . . . . . . . still feels like going uphill!

QBS

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #24 on: May 10, 2012, 12:18:36 AM »
fret nut, I can certainly identify with your desire for 200 more cc's.  I've often thought the same thing.  However, after much cogitation, I've come to think that only 100 more would be a better bike.  A xz750 would be scary fast, especially in the 0-70 mph range.  Kinda like a 500 or 750 kawasaki triple.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2012, 11:24:45 AM by QBS »

Rikugun

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #25 on: May 10, 2012, 09:39:10 AM »
Quote
Kinda like a 500 or 750 kawasaki triple
  Sure, they could wheelie at highway speed but talk about evil handling!  :o The Vision handles like a dream compared to thoses beasts  :D   :D
It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is then to persist in delusion, however satisfying or reassuring.  Carl Sagan

fret not

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2012, 12:44:05 AM »
When the Kawasaki triples hit the market (500 first) the racing organization that held our races made a rule that even in the box stock class the H1s had to have other than stock rear shocks.  Owners of other brands of bikes complained and then they all were allowed to have Koni , Girling,  S&W, or what ever they wanted.  Yes, they were evil handling, but any bike can be scarey if pushed hard enough.  "Bamboo frames" is what they called them.  They would pass in the straights and you would get them back in the turns.  That made for a bit more action and a lot more smoke. :D
Retired, on the downhill slide. . . . . . . . still feels like going uphill!

Rikugun

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2012, 08:39:07 AM »
We called them "twisto-flex" frames  :D
It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is then to persist in delusion, however satisfying or reassuring.  Carl Sagan

Rick G

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Re: 1982 Vision and Venture rear end
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2012, 10:53:48 PM »
When I did test rides on H1's I used a corner with a run off , so that when the  thing (with its ball joint frame ) required that I quit pushing it , I had some where to go. Customers get so testy when you drop their bike!
 On one test ride on the Riverside Freeway , I was passing the cars at an indicated 118 mph . Motorists were cranking there heads around to see what was howling and of course I was long gone , by then.
I had the job of exchanging the frame on a three fifty Kwaker , rotary valve twin and we compared it to the H1 . It was nearly identical except for the brackets. The H1 frame was badly over stressed.
When Evon Duhamel rode them he crashed a lot . Later he admitted the handled horribly and it took massive bribery to get him to ride them.
At night if you looked under the tank you would see sparks flying every where under there . We replaced the horrible  Japanese plug wire, with Packard 440 or Belden wire.
The first ones came back with seized cylinders . No preference as to which one , a differant one on each bike, would be seized. The explanation was the , when the cylinders were being finish honed , too much pressure was being applied to keep them in place and this was distorting them . They were coming out of the fixture out of round.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2012, 11:04:11 PM by Rick G »
Rick G
Go soothingly on the grease mud, as there in lurks the skid demon
'82.5 Yamaha XZ550 RJ  Vision,
'90 Suzuki VX800, 1990 Suzuki DR350.
'74  XL350   Honda , 77 XL350 Honda, 78 XL350 Honda, '82 XT 200 Yamaha, '67 Yamaha YG1TK, 80cc trail bike

 

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